Learning

no “right way” to schedule

learning

2 minute read


There’s no “right way” to schedule.

We can sometimes get caught looking for the singly solution, the one technique or tactic. And so we try on these processes, thinking that the process for how we schedule is the answer. But it’s not the process – it’s about checking in with you.

It’s about the energy you bring to scheduling.

It’s about what resonates with you in terms of how you like to schedule and what makes sense for your day to day. This doesn’t mean don’t use a specific scheduling practice – but it does mean check in with yourself about how you’re showing up and approaching your schedule.

It also means thinking about what helps you.

  • Does it help you to calendar out every day? If yes, do it, if no, don’t.
  • Does it help you to create a to do list? If yes, do it, if no, don’t.
  • Does it help you to block out focus time? If yes, do it, if no, don’t.
  • Do you want to get specific about when you’ll check your email and when you’ll respond? If yes, do it, if no, don’t.

Notice and create your practice based on what helps you. Not because some system or course told you it is the “right way” but because it is aligned with what you’re wanting for how you approach your day.

So much of it comes down to your energy. To the way you feel as you schedule. To how you’re seeing the tasks that you’re scheduling. There is no one single right way. Instead, you get to create the way that works for you.

This 12-minute video shares more.


Post author headshot

Written by: Lisa Philyaw

Lisa is a Confidence Coach and co-founder of beliefseed. She has coached over 1,000 clients, has a Master’s in Psychology, and is a Certified Life Coach. Her mission is to help people show up fully as themselves so they can take charge of their life, their way.

learning isn’t linear

learning

3 minute read


Learning something new can feel uncomfortable. We like being good at things, and we don’t like being bad at them. But to learn something new, we will likely have to be pretty bad at it for a while. We’ll be confused and not understand what’s going on. When we have that expectation going in it makes the process of learning much easier.

What we think learning will be like

linear graph

Our brains are wired to think linearly. We expect to incrementally learn at the same rate over time. This can be frustrating because we feel like we should be further along in our new skill than we are. Frustrated that we don’t get it yet and not understanding why it’s taking us so long to get there. Feeling stupid and that other people would learn it faster.

What learning is actually like

exponential graph

In reality, learning isn’t linear. When learning something new there’s often a lot to learn. That means we won’t understand how all the pieces fit together at first. We could suck at it for a while.

But then something magical happens. One day, things start to click. Those previously disjointed concepts start to get clarity around them and we start understanding how they fit together. We have aha moments! It starts to make sense!

When that happens, our skill begins to exponentially take off. We rapidly improve, and pretty soon, we get close to the skill level we want to be at. We might not be at the exact level we need to be yet, but we’ve now seen such huge progress that we believe in ourselves and can see the path forward to get there. We have momentum.

What’s important to keep in mind is that we need to have patience during the time when our learning hasn’t taken off yet. Patience when we don’t understand yet. To learn something truly new and complex we could be in that confusion zone for years. Are we willing to put in that effort and time to get good at something? If what we’re learning will help us in a meaningful enough way, the answer is absolutely.

Too often people quit because it’s not clicking yet. But they could be quitting just before their learning was about to explode and take off exponentially.

What if we quit here?

exponential graph with arrow

If we can keep at it long enough, chances are good that it’ll start to click. And when it does, our new skill can change our lives.


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Written by: Jordan Philyaw

Jordan is a co-founder of beliefseed. He's a self taught software engineer, lifelong learner, manifestor, and vegetarian.

the different ways we learn

learning

2 minute read


We all learn and process information differently.

For me, I find I don’t know my point until I start making it.

By talking it out, I actually discover the purpose of what I’m saying.

When I was in school the way I learned was by literally teaching the concept to myself out loud.

I had a tiny whiteboard and I’d pretend I was talking to students to show them and teach them the concepts – concepts I had just discovered.

I learn by teaching. This is my way.

What’s yours?

Some are more reflective. They sit with it, sleep on it, go for a run, take a break, and the solution or knowing percolates up for them.

Others write it out, see it, hear it, feel it. Take it all in, and then through that soaking up they learn.

Others are doers. They are experiential, kinesthetic. They learn through taking action and trying and doing and that cements the knowledge for them.

What about you?

We all have aspects of all of these within us, and all of these strategies help us learn. But knowing your preferred way can help. Because it allows you to structure how you take information in and reflect it back in a way that is most in line with you.

For me, it’s always been through teaching and talking.

People think you have to know before you teach. And yes, to an extent that’s true. But when you teach, you really get to know. At least that is how it’s always been for me.

So find your way. And use it. Even if it doesn’t match the ways of those around you. Or the company you work for. Or how your family tends to operate.

Your way matters. It’s how you operate. It’s how you learn. Cherish it, cultivate it, and learn because of it.


Post author headshot

Written by: Lisa Philyaw

Lisa is a Confidence Coach and co-founder of beliefseed. She has coached over 1,000 clients, has a Master’s in Psychology, and is a Certified Life Coach. Her mission is to help people show up fully as themselves so they can take charge of their life, their way.